Tuesday, 13 December 2016 00:00

Music and Your Brain Documentary

By Dr. Mercola

Music predates language and speaks to us on a primal level. Thinking back to your adolescence, you probably associate key memories with the soundtracks that played during these formative years.

Before this, music likely began shaping your reality during infancy — there’s even evidence that babies respond to music while still in the womb. At the other end of the spectrum, elderly people, too, including those struggling with degenerative conditions, come alive again when they hear their favorite tunes.

“What is it about music that moves us so intensely and directly, and how can it be employed in the treatment of neurological and physical disorders?” Such are the questions answered and explored in the above documentary, “Music on the Brain.”

Miraculous Results Simply by Sharing Music With Dementia Patients

In the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, patients often become moody and withdrawn. They may forget events as well as their own personal history, leading to a loss of identity and self.

The simple act of listening to music may help people with Alzheimer’s to reconnect with the people around them and even remember past life events, which is why the non-profit organization Music & Memory has made this their mission.

The organization works with nursing home staff and elder care professionals, along with family caregivers, to create and provide personalized music playlists using digital audio systems like iPods to people with dementia.

When executive director Dan Cohen first thought of the idea in 2006, he was surprised that none of the 16,000 long-term care facilities in the U.S. used iPods for their residents.

He spearheaded efforts to change that, and today personalized music programs are available in thousands of nursing homes and other facilities in the U.S., Canada, Europe and beyond.

In the video below you can see a clip of nursing-home resident Henry, who was “reawakened” by listening to his favorite musical artist, Cab Calloway.

As Music & Memory put it, “These musical favorites tap deep memories not lost to dementia and can bring participants back to life, enabling them to feel like themselves again, to converse, socialize and stay present … The results can be nothing short of miraculous.” The video below speaks for itself.

Personalized Music May Reduce Agitation and Use of Drugs in Alzheimer’s Patients

It’s interesting to note that some of music’s benefits appear to be rooted in its familiarity. That is, a person’s favorite music or songs they associate with important events can trigger a memory of the song’s lyrics, the related event and even the feelings and experience of it.

In many cases, listening to individualized music appears to be more effective than listening to a random song.

In one study of 39 people in a long-term care facility in Iowa, for example, listening to individualized music led to a significant reduction in agitation (such as anxiety, shouting and irritability) both during and after the session — more so than occurred when residents listened to generic classical relaxation music.

Other research has shown individualized music may calm agitated patients and lead to significantly lower anxiety scores.

The success of the technique depends on nursing staff being able to figure out a patient’s musical preferences, which is why you may want to ask your aging relatives about their favorite songs now (or relay yours to your caregivers) just in case.

It’s also dependent on a person’s interest in music throughout life. You needn’t be overly musical to appreciate music emotionally, as virtually everyone does, but as written in the World Journal of Psychiatry (WJP):

“ … [I]t would not be appropriate for a person who did not have an appreciation for music prior to the onset of cognitive impairment. A positive correlation is expected between the degree of significance that music had in the person’s life prior to the onset of dementia and effectiveness of the intervention.”

However, listening to music is a simple, inexpensive and risk-free intervention that has the potential to benefit many.

The response from nursing homes that have implemented Music & Memory’s individualized music program has been overwhelmingly positive, with many even reporting reduced drug use as a result. Margaret Rivers of Coler-Goldwater Specialty Hospital & Nursing Facility in New York City told Music & Memory:

“One of the more positive results we’re seeing is a reduction in the need for psychotropic medication. Music soothes the residents to the point where they actually may not need all of the medications that they needed prior to going on [Music & Memory’s] program.”

Familiar Songs May Help Alzheimer’s Patients Recall Memories

When you listen to music, a broad range of neural networks become engaged, including those linked to autobiographical memories and emotions. The brain region behind your forehead, known as the medial prefrontal cortex, is one of the last to atrophy among Alzheimer’s patients; it’s also the hub that music activates.

Petr Janata, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology at University of California (UC) Davis’ Center for Mind and Brain, conducted a study to map the brain activity of subjects as they listened to music. He said in a press release:

“What seems to happen is that a piece of familiar music serves as a soundtrack for a mental movie that starts playing in our head.

It calls back memories of a particular person or place, and you might all of a sudden see that person’s face in your mind’s eye … Now we can see the association between those two things — the music and the memories.”

Janata is among those who believe providing Alzheimer’s patients with digital music players and customized playlists could improve their quality of life. In some cases it may also help them to share those memories as well.

When Alzheimer's patients sat in rooms filled with music and were asked to tell a story about their life, their stories contained more meaningful words, were more grammatically complex, and conveyed more information (per number of words) than stories told in a silent room.

The findings suggest that exposure to music may help people with Alzheimer's disease to overcome neurolinguistic limitations. This makes sense, the study's co-author noted, because "music and language processing share a common neural basis." In the video below, the late Dr. Oliver Sacks, neurologist and author of “Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain,” explained how listening to familiar music may allow Alzheimer’s patients to access personal memories that have otherwise become inaccessible.

Your Brain Is Hard-Wired to Respond to Music

Music on the Brain discusses that music may have evolved from an earlier form of emotional communication, an emotional proto-language of the sort you may hear between a mother and a baby. Tone of voice and pitch are incredibly important before language emerges, and it’s thought this early form of communication eventually split into language, which conveys more information, and music, which conveys emotion.

When you hear music, many areas of your brain light up. Music triggers activity in the nucleus accumbens, a part of your brain that releases the feel-good chemical dopamine and is involved in forming expectations.

At the same time, the amygdala, which is involved in processing emotion, and the prefrontal cortex, which makes possible abstract decision-making, are also activated. Meanwhile, oxytocin, the bonding hormone that’s released when we interact with our loved ones, is also released by music, specifically by singing together.

Many evolutionary biologists believe that music was fundamental in our ability to function as humans and hold together large communities of people, as music is capable of producing oxytocin, i.e., bonding and sharing emotions, on a massive scale.

Music Helps People With Parkinson’s Disease Move More Freely

Even brain areas that control movement are affected by music. This may seem strange until you consider that movement, such as drumming, was once essential to creating music. Today, music is now being used to help people with diseases like Parkinson’s to move more freely.

Slowness, tremor, stiffness and impaired balance are common in Parkinson’s patients, but emerging research suggests music may be an effective non-drug intervention. People who ordinarily are unable to control their movements are suddenly able to follow the beat of a song and dance. The music seems to provide an external rhythm that bypasses the malfunctioning signals in the brain.

A variety of neurological disorders have shown improvement from music-based interventions, including not only Parkinson’s disease but also multiple sclerosis and stroke. In fact, music-based interventions had similar or greater effects than conventional rehabilitation on upper limb function, mobility and cognition among people with neurological disorders.

Music Opens a Back Door for Memory Recall in Your Brain

By tapping areas of your brain linked to both emotions and memory, music can act as a back door to help you access past events that would otherwise be lost. As Music & Memory put it:

“Even for persons with severe dementia, music can tap deep emotional recall. For individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s, memory for things — names, places [and] facts — is compromised, but memories from our teenage years can be well-preserved.

Favorite music or songs associated with important personal events can trigger memory of lyrics and the experience connected to the music. Beloved music often calms chaotic brain activity and enables the listener to focus on the present moment and regain a connection to others.

Persons with dementia, Parkinson’s and other diseases that damage brain chemistry also reconnect to the world and gain improved quality of life from listening to personal music favorites.”

If you’re a caregiver to someone with dementia, creating a personalized playlist for him or her is a simple way to help them reconnect with the outside world and feel like themselves again, even for a little while.

On a larger scale, if you have a loved one in a nursing home, you may want to suggest they consider the use of individualized music for their residents. Music & Memory also accepts donations of gently used Apple music players, including iPods, iPhones or iPads. If you have one you’re no longer using, consider donating it to this worthwhile cause.

 

Published in Health Plus
Wednesday, 28 September 2016 00:00

Takahara Suiko

 

No love songs for her

Article from the Sun daily by Jessica Chua (posted on 27 September 2016)

TAKAHARA Suiko aka The Venopian Solitude’s first attempt at writing happened when she was griping about her brother on her blog using metaphors. She was only 14 when she learnt how to mask her words. Little did she know, she was paving the way for songwriting.

“It’s a horrible way to start writing, but it taught me how to be creative,” said the 26-year-old.

Despite her growing interest in music, Takahara took up electronic engineering in Japan to appease her parents. But as she was about to finish her diploma, she concluded that studying engineering became a chore, and she just wasn’t cut out for it.

So Takahara returned to Malaysia to focus on creating music – producing a number of EPs along the way, and even released her first full-length album Hikayat Perawan Majnun in 2014. The singer-songwriter dabbles in various sounds and genres, but one thing’s for sure: she doesn’t write love songs.

“I tried to but I couldn’t. It’s just too personal. Even if I did, I wouldn’t put it out,” she said.

Takahara recently hit another milestone as she’s the first Malaysian artiste selected – among thousands from over 100 countries – to attend the esteemed Red Bull Music Academy in Montreal this September.

“I'm trying not to let the pressure of being the first Malaysian alumna get to me because it will definitely distract me from learning as much as I can, and to some extent, basking in Montreal while I'm there,” she divulged.

Could you recall the beginning of your affair with music?

I started composing music in standard two or three. I wanted to take up piano but my mother didn’t allow it. So I started making melodies using my father’s phone instead. That was when phones had monotone sounds you can play with. I never had any exposure to musical instruments except for the recorder in school. So it was either that or the phone.

How would you describe your music?

It’s really loud and annoying. I say that because I don’t know what kind of style it is. It changes from song to song. If you don’t agree with that and you happen to like it, then good for you. I scream a lot when I perform live – it’s necessary to convey the emotion that was written for that part of the lyrics or song.

What is music to you?

Music is something as natural as breathing and eating. I don’t pride myself in doing music because it’s like having pride in eating and breathing. Everyone does that. But it comes naturally to me that it doesn’t become a thing that I focus on. Like eating and brushing my teeth afterwards, music is something that I have to do, whether I like it or not.

The best piece of advice you’ve ever received.

There are several but the one that I really remember is by Fynn Jamal. She told me to make my own path, and that I cannot follow other people’s paths because I’m different. While everyone else walks down a certain path, it was actually easier for me to make something of my own because the other paths were already crowded. To me, that was a revelation.

What is your main goal?

I would like to experience a black hole. I guess that’s the metaphor of my dream; to understand something that I don’t understand, and to understand as many things as I can.

Where do you want to see this industry go?

All fields have to collaborate to make every field relevant to each other, which can foster appreciation. People are starting to appreciate some form of art now, like a nice-looking tudung or a locally made T-shirt. To me, that direction will head towards performing arts as well. For example, Yuna incorporated a silat artist and ballerina in her recent music video. But right now, it’s too early to say whether or not it’ll work. It will take time. But what matters is that we keep doing it.

TRIVIA

Favourite time of the day: When she goes to bed.
Childhood ambition: Doctor.
Currently on repeat: Yuna’s Unrequited Love.
Where to find her: Takahara Suiko (YouTube), The Venopian Solitude (Bandcamp)


Published in Biographies
Wednesday, 13 April 2016 00:00

Science Said Music’s Good For You

By Health+ Magazine

What if I tell you that music isn’t just good for your ears but your health too? Based on recent study, music has been found particularly effective in improving health, both physically and mentally. No kidding.

Here are FIVE reasons why:

1. ACTS AS A PAIN KILLER

Music can help a person feel less pain as it is a form of distraction. Many hospitals are using this method to complement the anesthesia given to patients particularly during labour. This will further decrease post-natal anxiety and pain while lowering the chances of postpartum depression. The next time you’re in pain, skip the pills and give music a try.

2. BOOSTS IMMUNE SYSTEM

Certain type of music can create a positive and profound emotional experience, which helps produce immune boosting hormones. This helps reducing the factors responsible for illness.

3. SLEEP BETTER

Don’t you just miss being well-rested? Listening to classical music has been shown to effectively treat insomnia in college students by helping them relax. Perhaps the slow music works as a lullaby to those who aren’t able to sleep naturally.

4. BAD MOOD NO MORE

It’s not something new that music can help improve your mood depending on the genre. Go for a more upbeat music to start your day right.

5. AIDS MEMORY

It has been proven that music helps to recall information. Which means whatever you’ve learned while listening to a particular song can often be recalled by “playing” the song mentally.

Finally, more reasons to have your headphones on!

Published in Health Plus
Thursday, 25 February 2016 00:00

Wanted Symphony

 

Striking a chord

Article from the Sun daily by Pam Kaur (posted on 23 Feb 2016)

THE formative years of Wanted Symphony were most definitely rocky, even if it's impossible to guess with the strong bond shared between its members Daniel Wong, Andrew Mok and Aaron Jiam.

But with a shared passion for good music, Wong, Mok and Jiam overcame the obstacles with plenty of communication and familiarising with each other's tastes in music, to get their band up and running.

This year, the alternative rock outfit is embracing their sixth anniversary, and not only does the trio make music together; they have become the best of buddies searching for the same goals in music.

Lead vocalist Wong, 26, guitarist Mok, 23, and drummer Jiam, 25 have full-time jobs and play as Wanted Symphony after work and during the weekends.

But juggling between two vocations did not stop them from winning several awards including at the 2012 VIMA Music Awards, and performing at Urbanscapes and the Shout! Awards.

How did the name 'Wanted Symphony' come about?

We were randomly sharing words and names that resembled us. After awhile, the word 'symphony' was mentioned and it felt right so we decided to keep it. 'Wanted' on the other hand, was decided after weeks of deliberation because we wanted to make people who listen to our music feel like they want more.

What are some of the things that inspire your compositions?

Things that happen in our lives inspire us; usually drawn from relationships and our perspective on things. Funnily, some of our music was composed based on a chord that was struck on the guitar at 4am which felt so right.

Could you share your passions as a band, other than music?

Being Malaysians, who are juggling two different roles in our full-time jobs and the band, we often gather to participate in our favourite activity: eating. We are passionate about food because we seem to bond better around a meal.

How does Wanted Symphony stand out from so many other bands out there?

We choose to believe that we're different from how we try to present ourselves. We try to engage with our audience and fans through a monthly series that we hold, known as Soundstruck: LIVE. This is our initiative to give back to the people who have given us so much through their endless support. At Soundstruck: LIVE, we create a platform for young, passionate and potential musicians like us to unleash their talents. We've been running this for almost two years now.

Name us a key factor that makes your music unique.

We create music from our hearts. We take our music very seriously and each note we play has an expression of its own.

How do you guys juggle between the band and a full-time job?

It is not easy. We won't deny that it is a challenge,
and sometimes it does get to us. However, we are driven by passion. We do it because we love what we do. There are many sacrifices and compromises that we have been making on this journey but we've gotten used to it.


Published in Biographies
Thursday, 11 February 2016 00:00

Razlan Shah

 

More than a song

Article from the Sun daily by Joyce Ang (posted on 11 Feb 2016)

BELIEVE it or not, there was a time when Razlan Shah was ridiculed for his horrendous singing , or so he claimed.

"I used to busk at Telawi Street in Bangsar because I was so bad that I wasn't allowed to sing in the house, and oh my goodness, the amount of heckling and trash thrown into my guitar case was unbelievable," he laughed.

However, that experience spurred him on to pursue what he loves – regardless of the rejections and obstacles that came his way – at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts.

Now, not only is the 25-year-old an artiste in his own right, he also manages Najwa Mahiaddin, Bassment Syndicate, and Kyoto Protocol.

Would you ever only sing or manage?

As an artiste, I love singing as a mode of expression, but I like to look at different avenues or different mediums to find expression. With management, it's not so much about expressing, but letting artistes express what they really want, as opposed to making them create content that is geared towards generic interest.

The artistes I work with have completely different dreams and creative methods, so it's always fun to explore those with them, and work with their craft. It's a very rewarding process because instead of just working on me, I get to work on other people! It is one thing to make your dreams come true, but a completely different feeling to make another person's dream come true.

What's your take on the Malaysian music industry?

Like any arts industry in Malaysia, it has great potential. We have so much to share! However, I think the biggest obstacle to its growth is the lack of gumption in artistes. A lot of Malaysian artistes are big fishes in small ponds, but many stop when they've attained some sort of achievement, then move on to something else. I want more people to be hungry to do something bigger. The world is so connected and globalised now; it is disappointing to see only a handful of Malaysian artistes that have crossed borders. We have numerous artistes with great original sound – I want more of that – and I'm proud to say that the artistes that I work with are keen to do more.

As an artiste, what do you want to achieve through your art?

You know how sometimes when you watch a film, something they do or say just strikes you and you go, 'Wow, I've never thought of it that way before!'? I want to do that with my art. I want to bring people fresh perspective and different angles to a thought.

What would you like to do before you reach 30?

I want to see my artistes grow and achieve their dreams. For myself, I will release my art just for that sake and not so much to gain awards or airtime.

If anybody wants to listen to my music, by all means they shall. In fact, I will be releasing my next EP, Hounds, for free for the first few months. I also want to hopefully start creating films.

Tell us more about Hounds.

Hounds refer to the hunting dog, which is a metaphor for searching. It is for the twenty-somethings, and is essentially about the pursuit of purpose, and that includes self-doubt, finding inner confidence and the sense of self. It has about five songs; and I have released, with Darren Ashley, a music video for Jungle, one of the singles from the EP.

 


Published in Biographies
Thursday, 04 February 2016 00:00

Najwa Mahiaddin

 

Songs for the soul

Article from the Sun daily by Joyce Ang (posted on 11 Dec 2015)

FROM learning the piano at the tender age of three to graduating from Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts, music has always been a prominent part of Najwa Mahiaddin’s life.

“Ever since I was little, I have always been intrigued by music. It always makes me feel something; it was a way for me to express myself,” said the contemporary writing and production graduate.

Now 29, the songstress has performed on many renowned stages, and received some of the most prestigious awards in the Malaysian music industry.

However, even with all that she’s achieved so far, what matters most to her is the impact of her music on people.

How did you get started in this industry?
The very first time I got a gig was actually through Mia Palencia. I was still studying when I attended one of her workshops, where I got to sing one of my originals.

After the performance, she approached me and told me that she liked my performance, and invited me to be featured on one of her projects, the Bedroom Musician series. That was my first show as a singer-songwriter playing my own music.

It was a nice feeling, just me on the keyboard. Then, Reza Salleh, one of the pioneers in the Malaysian singer-songwriter scene, came up to me and offered me another gig.

From there, I was offered more gigs on various stages and at different venues, including No Black Tie.

Describe an event that shaped who you are today.
There was a time when I was going through a lot of things that I was unhappy about, and I was using music to make me feel better.

Ironically, however, I did not write many sad songs at that time. That was when I knew for sure that I wanted to do music badly.

The moment my parents gave me the green light to pursue music was a turning point in my life because music has finally become more than just a hobby. I was enrolled into music school, and it was then that I felt like I was where I was meant to be.

From that day forth, I cannot think of anything else that I would rather be doing. Had that not happened, I would have been really depressed.

Can you share with us some of your accomplishments?
As an artiste, I want to give people a moment away from what they are going through and to give them hope despite everything, as well as to help people heal from past experiences.

For example, every time I perform After The Rain, a lot of people come up to tell me that the song resonated with them. To me, accomplishments are not just about winning awards. To be able to touch lives already makes me feel like a winner.

Where do you see yourself in five years?
I hope to travel more. I hope to spread my music to more places, experience different cultures, and to collaborate with people from all around the globe – a privilege I had while I was at Berklee, without all the travelling.

I would also like to bring traditional Malaysian music to other parts of the world, and educate the rest of the world about the music that we have here.

Tell us more about your latest song, "Sama Saja"?
The song is about how we are all different in culture, opinion, et cetera, but essentially the same at the end of the day. It’s the first time that people were invited to watch and be part of the video shoot, so I’m very excited about it.

Trivia

Ultimate comfort food: Mum’s cooking.
Favourite festive season: “I’m Malaysian, so it’s hard to choose one. I would say all of the festive seasons!”
Favourite musicians: Lalah Hathaway, Emily King, Little Dragon.
Favourite movies: Grease (1978) and Mary Poppins (1964).


Published in Biographies
Tuesday, 26 January 2016 00:00

Annatasha Saifol

 

The girl who does everything

Article from the Sun daily by Jessica Chua (posted on 17 Dec 2015)

STUDYING at Berklee College of Music is possibly on the bucket list of every aspiring musician. This dream is not as far-fetched as it once was for Annatasha Saifol because she is well on her way to joining the likes of John Mayer and Steven Tyler as alumni of the world's largest independent college of contemporary music.

Annatasha's entry into the renowned music school in Boston was quite a process. She waited three months to audition at the International College of Music, and stuck around for another four months before she could take a 12-week online music fundamentals course. Her blood, sweat and tears finally paid off when she got accepted into Berklee to study Music Production and Engineering.

Despite pursuing culinary arts after high school, running an online pastry business, and freelancing as a photographer, she never let go of her dream career in music because it is something that never ceased to fascinate her.

"Music has always been a big part of me since I was really young. The fact that a collection of sounds, with or without words, can trigger emotions really sparked my interest," explained the 22-year-old.

How has your experience in Berklee been so far?

The experience is unexplainable. Sure, music can be studied anywhere across the world. But in Berklee, the people you meet and the opportunities that come by are so rare. All the friends and teachers I've met over the past two semesters have been incredible. On the other hand, there have also been tough times when I felt absolutely incompetent. Everyone around me is so talented and they constantly remind me of my insecurity. I struggled to better myself as a musician, but after a while I got over it because that's what I'm here for – to be better at what I do.

What drives your passion in music?

The same thing that drives my love for cooking. Watching people enjoy what you do is like watching people eat your food. Going to a concert and feeling the way I do, or watching the people react to music the way they do, that drives my passion. It reminds me of how impactful music is. I guess you could also say that curiosity drives my passion in music, because I want to know exactly what makes great music, great!

Tell us about the ups and downs of being a musician.

Being your own biggest critique is definitely both an up and down of being a musician. You always want to improve your work, to be a better musician, but sometimes you're so hard on yourself that you don't get anything done! That's something I battle with a lot.

What do you hope to speak through your music?

Above anything else, I want every listener to know that they are not alone at any point of their lives. It is important for me to remind all my young friends out there that no matter how quiet it gets, my music can help to fill that void. I want to be their companion, musically.

How would you encourage your peers in this generation to pursue their passion?

Even if life throws you off-track, persevere. As long as you keep on wanting, whatever life brings, you will end up closer to your passion. I did photography and culinary arts, still dreaming about music at the time. But had I not done culinary school, my pastry business and freelance photography, I would never have saved enough money to come to Berklee. A certain path may seem irrelevant to your passion, but keep that fire burning and you will eventually get there.


Published in Biographies
Tuesday, 05 January 2016 00:00

Josh Kua

 

Pulling heartstrings

Article from the Sun daily by Jessica Chua (posted on 4 Nov 2015)

ONE of Josh Kua's earliest memories in violin training involves the Suzuki method – which has nothing to do with the famed motorcycle company, if you're wondering.

"It is a learning method to practise good posture, how to listen and play by ear. I started with an empty cereal box with a ruler taped to it, and a wooden spoon for the bow, to master holding a violin," explained Kua, who grew up in Australia and started training at the age of four.

Most people may assume that trained instrumentalists would further their education in music, but in fear of losing his passion during the studying process, Kua decided against the popular belief. Instead, he obtained double degrees in law and commerce.

His career path took a huge turn when he went on his first mini tour in the Philippines during his third year in university. Since then, his music has gone on to reach audiences around Asia, including Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, and currently, China.

Speaking of his personal style, the 26-year-old shared that "less is more. I like lyrical music. It is like my singing voice, except I don't sing. I gravitate towards acoustic music, acoustic pop or alternative rock because that is the kind of music I grew up with."

Have you always been confident about your musical talents?

I didn't foresee a career coming out of it. It was something that I did just for fun, but I guess I knew that I was better than average. One of my strengths is improvisation. I usually have a rough plan of what I'm going to do when I perform, but no two performances are ever the same.

Does being a musician give you a different outlook on life?

I would say I'm extremely lucky to be able to travel for my work. It has changed my way of thinking because I've been exposed to different cultures and environments. I think when you are stuck in one place your whole life, your mind gets used to thinking in a certain way. So I've been very lucky to travel and work, and open my mind to different ways of life and thinking.

How would you define music?

Music is definitely a universal language which I experienced while travelling to different countries. It is a way for me to express to the world and for us to understand each other. I find it very fulfilling when I perform and people get touched by the sentiment that I was conveying through my music. It doesn't matter if they interpreted it differently, in fact it makes it better because I have spoken to them in a way that I never thought I would.

What do you want people to hear or see through your music?

I want them to see me. It is important for me to be authentic in my performances; maybe that's why I am more inclined towards stripped-down kind of music.I never like to focus too much on image and I don't like gimmicks. So I like to show who I am – less is more.

If you could impart one lesson to your peers, what would you say?

Practice makes perfect. Whether or not you were born with a gift, anything can be earned as long as you put in effort and work hard for it. Nothing comes easy. So if you're discouraged and you feel like you're not getting anywhere with whatever it may be, just put in work and be smart. Get to know the right people, make them believe in you, and just do your best.

Published in Biographies
Wednesday, 23 December 2015 00:00

Christian Palencia

 

Sleepless songs

Article from the Sun daily by Joyce Ang (posted on 24th Nov 2015)

IF there was music coming out of a window from the wee small hours to the break of dawn, it would most likely be Christian Palencia's, who's now known (aptly) as The Last One Awake.

Previously going by the stage name ChristianBPalencia, the 21-year-old has been leaving his footprints in the local music scene, having performed at numerous public and intimate venues, including the 2013 TedxYouth@KL event.

Apart from his presence in the Malaysian scene, Palencia has also been spending a substantial amount of time in Tasmania, Australia. In fact, in recent months, he has been working on a new album there for the next phase of his musical career, which is going to sound different from his previous works.

"The Last One Awake's songs are folk-like, but the lyrics don't exactly go along with new-age folk, so I call it 'storytelling music', but people have also been calling my music 'midnight music'. I have no idea why, but I thought that it's quite cool and catchy, so I guess the genre would be storyteller midnight music," Palencia explained.

Why do you go by The Last One Awake now?

I tested the waters with The Last One Awake as my photography handle for about a year, and thought that I would really like to be known by that name for the rest of my career.

Musically, I want to provide clarity and happiness to people, specifically to people feeling like they're the last ones awake at the tender hours of midnight. I want to portray that person. Also, because there are a lot of people who feel that way, I want to use The Last One Awake's music as a way to reach out to them and form a community – so they know that they are not alone –, slowly changing the world one smile at a time.

Tell us about your upcoming album.

The album is structured in a way that it is sort of like a rite of passage for late teens and young adults. It goes from searching for home in a person and when the person leaves, you search for home in places, but ultimately, you realise that home has always been in yourself. At the end of the album, it is about how after all these, you have to go back to the place where you started to fulfill the rite of passage, so the whole process is a bit of a loop.

I've also written about how reality is not what you perceive; how lying to children is the worst thing you can ever do; and about people that usually go unnoticed.

When and how did music become part of your life?

My first performance was when I was four: in front of 150 people at a concert, and I sang Backstreet Boys' Everybody (Backstreet's Back); it was very nervewracking. I performed and everybody loved it, so I thought "Okay, I want to do this for the rest of my life."

Were there times when you wanted to give up on that dream?

No, I decided when I was 17 that this is it. I've studied and worked on a bunch of things, including graphic design, production and writing. I did almost everything that I wanted to try, but I always knew that music is what I wanted to do and I'm not going to throw it away.

What would you like to achieve before you turn 30?

I want to be the best singer-songwriter in the world! I would also like to do a video with Ed Sheeran or Passenger, and be featured on The Mahogany Sessions.

In a parallel world, what do you think you'd be?

I would want to be a WWE wrestler, but unfortunately I'm too small and scrawny for that. Oh well, music it is – best singersongwriter in the world!




 

Published in Biographies
Friday, 18 December 2015 00:00

Sachie Amira

 

Pitch perfect

Article from the Sun daily by Pam Kaur (posted on 5th Nov 2015) 

HER name is Amira Sachie Amar Kenji Abdullah and when she sings, you will be well pleased.

Inspired by her mother who used to sing as hobby, Sachie developed a deep sense of passion for music as a child, and she couldn't picture herself doing anything else. At 18, she decided to pursue her dream with the stage name Sachié Amira, backed by many life's struggles that taught her to never give up in anything.

Sachie is a budding young talent who has no qualms taking on the challenge of singing different music genres. The singer-songwriter of Japanese, Korean, Indonesian and Malaysian descent doesn't limit herself because she believes in continuous learning to hone her skills.

Sachie, which means happiness, was christened by her Japanese father. The name couldn't be more fitting as this bubbly 23-year-old has so much zest for life!

Who are your biggest encouragers?

They are none other my family – my mother, father and grandmother.

Where do you draw inspirations to write songs?

I'm inspired by many different experiences in life. Some of the experiences I incorporate into my songs are based on relationships, public affairs such as political issues, which I share in a metaphor of love. My creative outlet is my room. I like to collect my thoughts in my room because it is where I most feel myself.

Who are some of the local artistes you have sung with?

I've yet to sing alongside a local artiste but I've been blessed to be able to do the opening show for Girls' Generation. Aside from that, I've sung backups for Ning Baizura and Datuk Siti Nurhaliza.

Given the chance, who would you do a duet with, and why?

Undoubtedly, it would be Beyoncé. I am a big fan of Beyoncé because I am inspired by how she manages her life and juggles her many roles as a woman. I'm also captivated by her strong vocals. To me, Beyoncé is perfect.

What are some of your views about today's music industry here in Malaysia?

I am really proud of it. The growth is constant I'm proud to see that there are many new elements to music, even though a lot of it are filtered. The local musicians are changing the course of our industry.There are many talented people here.

What are your hopes for the industry?

I hope that there would be more freedom and support. Local talents lack respect here. We are undervalued because of the mindset that foreign artistes are better than us, when actually we are quite good ourselves.

Could you share with us the dreams that you wish to achieve through music?

I wish to be recognised and respected here in Malaysia, to begin with. I do hope that I'd also be an internationally recognised artiste, and go on a world tour spreading love through my music.

 

Published in Biographies
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